Tag: writing

Celebrate the Small Things – Gratitude

Small Things Photo credit: Shermeee / Foter.com / CC BY

My weekly gratitude post, in the Celebrate the Small Things [ongoing] Blog Hop.

Had a great Mother’s Day weekend.

Sustained my workout schedule this week, making me three-fer.

Reached the half-way point on a huge day job task.

Figured out how to make excellent gluten-free onion rings.

Made acupuncture a priority, despite having a crazy week.

Great quality time with the kids this week, and a great date with my love!

What are you grateful for this week? How will you show thanks?

This post is part of VikLit‘s blog hop, Celebrate the Small ThingsParticipate by following the link and adding your name to the Linky list, then post your gratitude every Friday.  Easiest blog hop ever!

Click here to hop on… the hop, and thanks for coming with me on this journey of self-empowerment.

Photo credit: Shermeee / Foter.com / CC BY

Celebrate the Small Things – Gratitude

Small Things Photo credit: Shermeee / Foter.com / CC BY

My weekly gratitude post, in the Celebrate the Small Things [ongoing] Blog Hop.

Created a wonderful landscape with my family this week, which included weeding enormous flower beds and tucking in lots of wonderful plant spirits.

Sustained my work out schedule this week, making me two-fer.

Had two magazine interviews. Not sure when they will come out.

Completed a cover story of a friend’s fabulous work. Again, no idea…

Great sessions with clients.

Had an article featured on The Wakeup.

What are you grateful for this week? How will you show thanks?

This post is part of VikLit‘s blog hop, Celebrate the Small ThingsParticipate by following the link and adding your name to the Linky list, then post your gratitude every Friday.  Easiest blog hop ever!

Click here to hop on… the hop, and thanks for coming with me on this journey of self-empowerment.

Photo credit: Shermeee / Foter.com / CC BY

Celebrate the Small Things – Gratitude

Small Things Photo credit: Shermeee / Foter.com / CC BYFor 9 years, I’ve been very careful to keep my blog focused on animistic and shamanistic content, and within those parameters what inspires, what sustains, what empowers. With that in mind, I’ve decided to participate in a weekly ritual with others, to celebrate otherwise small unsung accomplishments in my life.

I’m not very good at priding myself on anything, a trait upon which I’d like to improve. I’m also not as good about ceremony. I tend to keep things low key. With that in mind, every Friday myself and the other participants in this contagion of victory will spread the message of small successes. I hope that by undertaking this public personal endeavor you will learn more about me, and also be moved to realize the victories in your life, particularly the small ones that you would usually overlook.

This week has been a doozy, though I suppose they all are in some way.  My small victories this week are getting caught up on articles that needed to be written for others, having an article troubleshooting modern shamanic journeying come out in Circle Magazine (Issue 113), getting —->this close <— to finishing the first draft of my current manuscript, got a request for an interview.  A wild and unexpected development is that the Weekly Rune column was picked up by the Huffington Post. Also, I started working out regularly this week.  Finally, opening this blog to be more personal. Good things, all around.

What are you grateful for this week? How will you show thanks?

This post is part of VikLit‘s blog hop, Celebrate the Small ThingsParticipate by following the link and adding your name to the Linky list, then post your gratitude every Friday.  Easiest blog hop ever!

Click here to hop on… the hop, and thanks for coming with me on this journey of self-empowerment.

writing

Journaling as a Coping Device

writing As an author and pastoral counselor, I often encourage clients to write as a way to express feelings.  I know firsthand from penning my memoir, Gift of the Dreamtime – Awakening to the Divinity of Trauma, that often the synaptic processes fired in the creative act of writing stir emotions, memories, philosophies.  Journaling can be a very catabolic undertaking, though the results can be intensely cathartic.  From a spiritual standpoint, blending the chronology of events of your life with art is deeply empowering.

Often in response to my suggestion to journal as a means of coping with stress I’m met with conflict around why it won’t work.  “I don’t like to write.”  “I can’t write well.”  “I stare at the paper and nothing comes.”  “I don’t have anything to say.”  I get some stern looks when I encourage folks carrying these ideologies to write even more than those who greet the opportunity openly.  Why?  Not because I, personally, love to write, but because if you can put something into words, you’ve already made progress in eliminating the stress.  The ability to associate thoughts with feelings goes a long way in taking the charge out of those feelings.  Once free of emotional involvement, you can make clearer choices about how to proceed in the dynamic.

Even if you don’t write, give journaling a try.  Sit down and write whatever comes.  There are no rules or boundaries.  Your journal doesn’t have to be your deepest, darkest secrets.  You don’t have to approach journaling with any specific intention other than to offer yourself the outlet.

And if nothing comes, write your grocery list.  Write you To Do list for the day.  Write about how you have nothing to write about.  All it takes is getting started.  Before you know it you tap into a stream of consciousness and start forming opinions about what you are writing.

Maybe you start writing your grocery list and the thought occurs that for your evening meal you’d rather have mashed potatoes than cabbage, but you have to make cabbage to satisfy your visiting uncle.  In making that menu item concession, you have an emotional reaction.  You don’t really want to concede the mashed potatoes because since he’s been visiting he’s already taken over control of the television remote, and you’re mad that you missed your favorite show…

This free association is your avenue into cathartic journaling.  The synaptic process of writing taps into something primal, personal, pivotal.  It appeals to our most basic emotional urges in the limbic system—where we blend metaphor with reality, symbolism with structure.  How you react to what comes out gives meaning to your overall need for journaling.  Follow where your awareness leads you.  Just write it out and let the words come as they will.  The more you practice journaling, the easier it becomes.  Before long, you will anticipate the luxury of that release.

Originally published at Manic Readers.

Wise Voice – Janet Riehl – Author, Poet, Artist

I first met Janet through the chance joining of our work in Terry Laszlo-Gopadze’s anthology, “The Spirit of a Woman – Stories to Empower and Inspire.” Inspired by her words and vision connecting through art forms and with people, I consider her passion necessary to pass on to my readers.

Twisted Arms, by Janet Riehl

Twisted Arms, by Janet Riehl

Goddess in the Clay Amphora
by Janet Grace Riehl

There she is.
The goddess in the clay amphora.
The genie is the bottle.
Her torso only. Head, arms, legs left to suggestion.
Her little breasts, although she got a solution for breast augmentation
More belly and triangle next time.
Buttocks with a slight cleft. No tools. Just smooshed by fingers.
I’ll leave her here surrounded by the finger crunchies
that look like vertebrae or mud dauber nests.

The dousing rod twig, flipped. Which way?
The question becomes a container…a womb for an embryonic soul.
Being born out of this cocoon time.
Thumbs and forefingers enclose a womb.

I made all three of these clay sketches with my left hand.
They vary by size of clay.
Amount of pressure.
Slight reworking.
Look at the little cave and the little knot at the top!
The backs, the palm sides are more still. They hold the imprint of the lines of my hand.

Clay knuckles, not brass.
Knuckle down, Janet, get to work.
What would you have me do, Goddess?
I hold her like a talking stick and she speaks:
“Worship me.
Adore me.
Do my work which is your work.”

Janet is an award-winning author, blogger, and conference presenter living in St. Louis.  Sightlines: A Poet’s Diary, told in story poems, was recently made into an audio book  Sightlines: A Family Love Story in Poetry and Music.  Twice selected as finalist for Poet Laureate of Lake County, California and a member of Authors Guild, her poems, stories and essays are published in national literary magazines and several anthologies.  Visit her website, and find her on Facebook and @riehlife.